Tag Archives: grading

Videos: Law, radio, solid waste, busses, and qualifying fees @ LCC 2015-11-10

A month ago, nobody on the County Commission or staff knew how much the extra equipment might cost for the three Sheriff’s pursuit vehicles, but they awarded the bid to Langdale Ford anyway. The automobile dealer on the Commission did have some computations on why the higher bid might be more cost-effective. “We have the bids in the room” said the County Engineer, recommending awarding $1,188,500 to the Scruggs Company for Graded Aggregate Base, Curb-and-Gutter and Asphalt. He also noted “they will come in and place the curb and gutter”. The County Engineer also announced flashing and then regular traffic lights at Tillman Crossing on Old US 41 North.

Two citizens talked about dog problems: three dogs perhaps without shelter and barking dogs and arson.

Commissioner Demarcus Marshall is holding a Town Hall December 15th.

Here’s the agenda. See also the LAKE videos of the previous morning’s Work Session. Below are links to each of the videos of the Regular Session, followed by a video playlist. Meanwhile, they already met again this morning and will vote again Tuesday evening. Continue reading

Videos: Law, radio, solid waste, busses, and qualifying fees @ LCC 2015-11-09

The bid on three pursuit vehicles for the Sheriff got a question from Commissioner Scottie Orenstein about maintenance costs for which a staffer from Public Works just happened to be available to answer. Result: not the low bid. Commissioner Demarcus Marshall asked if they were going to pay $7,000 more per vehicle ongoing. Answer from County Manager Joe Pritchard: case by case. This was Monday morning 8:30 AM. They vote this evening (Tuesday) at 5:30 PM.

There was also a report from County Engineer Mike Fletcher about coordination with the railroad about traffic crossing from Old US 41 N.

Here’s the agenda. Below are links to each of the videos, followed by a video playlist. Continue reading

Law, radio, solid waste, busses, and qualifying fees @ LCC 2015-11-09

Monday morning 8:30 AM: a million bucks for road paving (Phillips Road, Burkhalter Subdivision, Cannon Drive, and Terracewood Drive), and an unknown (but smaller) amount in a grant re-application for the county’s on-demand MIDS bus system.

$30,534 plus shipping for two “screwpeller aerators” for the county’s Land Application Site (LAS), aka spray field: the county does not have a wastewater treatment plant. I’m pretty sure that’s the county’s LAS just east of Grassy Pond, southwest of Lake Park.

It only costs $360 to qualify to run for Tax Assessor, here in the only Georgia county that elects them.

Here’s the agenda. Continue reading

Media flap over Lowndes grading

Interesting timing, the Chamber deciding to pay off CUEE’s debts from pushing school consolidation, followed shortly by a media campaign to discredit the Lowndes School System.
17 January 2012:
Chamber of Commerce board decides to repay CUEE’s outstanding vendor debts in exchange for owning CUEE’s education document.
3 February 2012:
Maureen Downey blogged for the AJC, No zeros in school any longer. But aren’t there well deserved zeros? Despite admitting that the Lowndes school grading policy is a common practice in many systems and is intended to make sure students actually learn, she ends with this spin:
But aren’t there well deserved zeros?

I would argue that middle school teachers have some students who simply don’t do the work. They get it; they just don’t do it. The Lowndes policy calls for multiple interventions for obdurate students, but wouldn’t a zero make an important statement?

How else do adolescents learn that there are consequences for failure to comply with assignments? In the classroom, it is a zero. In the workplace, it is termination.

3 February 2012:
Lowndes School System Superintendent Dr. Steve Smith explained Lowndes grading policies, including this bit:
The Lowndes County Schools recently released grading guidelines for parents to clarify what has been our current practice on reporting of grades and to reaffirm our commitment to mastery learning by all students. For the past year and a half, our practice in grades 3-8 has been….
The point being that this is not a new policy.
Continue reading